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Origomi - Eric Gjerde's weblog on Origami & etc.

Origomi: Eric Gjerde's discussion and thoughts on origami, paperfolding, and tessellations.

This blog has moved to www.origamitessellations.com. Please update your bookmarks! thanks!


Google Print shows me an interesting book!

Doing a google print search for "origami tessellations" gives me this book:

Hinged Dissections: Swinging and Twisting, by Greg N. Frederickson of Purdue University in Indiana.

I can honestly say I would never have found this book if it was not indexed in Google Print. that seems like a huge plus for them, especially since this is exactly the sort of "long tail" money making scheme that google print helps out. (especially at $40 for this book!)

here's a snippet from the Cambridge Press description page:

----------

If you enjoy beautiful geometry and relish the challenge and excitement of something new, the mathematical art of hinged dissections is for you. Using this book, you can explore ways to create hinged collections of pieces that swing together to form a figure. Swing them another way and then, like magic, they form another figure! The profuse illustrations and lively text will show you how to find a wealth of hinged dissections for all kinds of polygons, stars and crosses, curved and even three-dimensional figures. For an added challenge, you can try using different kinds of hinges for twisting and flipping pieces. The author includes careful explanation of ingenious new techniques, as well as puzzles and solutions for readers of all mathematical levels. If you remember any high school geometry, you are already on your way. These novel and original dissections will be a gold mine for math puzzle enthusiasts, for math educators in search of enrichment topics, and for anyone who loves to see beautiful objects in motion.


• First book ever on hinged dissections


• Beautifully illustrated with over 500 diagrams


• Includes careful explanation of techniques, as well as puzzles and solutions for readers
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11/04/2005 09:10:00 AM

Wow, sounds like a cool book.. I especially like the sound of "careful explanation of techniques, as well as puzzles and solutions for readers" :)    



11/06/2005 04:03:00 PM

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