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Origomi - Eric Gjerde's weblog on Origami & etc.

Origomi: Eric Gjerde's discussion and thoughts on origami, paperfolding, and tessellations.

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WIP triangle fold, redux (reverse)


WIP triangle fold, redux (reverse)
Originally uploaded by Ori-gomi.
a slightly different attack on the triangle thing. can you tell that when I mentally envision something, I have to create it or it drives me nuts? this design is giving me stress, and I want to complete it and be done with it already.

regardless, here is a modified base, folded from a sheet of treated unryu. it's actually one of the scrap pieces left over from my testing process, which explains the random edges, etc.

it's very lovely paper, and is great to fold- it's extremely thin, but treating it properly makes it stiff and springy. much more so than standard kami (the paper you buy in a pack of 100 from the paper store.)

Something else worth noting here- on the star version of this fold, you're taking a pattern with hexagonal symmetry which gives you 6 shapes (thusly, 6 triangles). if you try the same methodology with triangular symmetry, you get 3 shapes with 6 sides. I suppose this is rather obvious, but it's still interesting to see it play out this way.

on the larger version of this that I did (here), I ended up with some odd hexagonal shapes on the bottom that became larger and larger as my folds progressed.

I need to refold this newer variant on larger paper that is more forgiving, so I can do better manipulation of my crease points and all the complicated sinks.
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